Looking for Participants

The MPI for Biological Cybernetics is looking for participants for some of their research experiments [more].
 

Most recent Publications

Buckenmaier K, Pedersen A, SanGiorgio P, Scheffler K, Clarke J and Inglis B (February-2019) Feasibility of Functional MRI at Ultralow Magnetic Field via Changes in Cerebral Blood Volume NeuroImage 186 185-191.
Giapitzakis I-A, Borbath T, Murali‐Manohar S, Avdievich N and Henning A (February-2019) Investigation of the influence of macromolecules and spline baseline in the fitting model of human brain spectra at 9.4T Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 81(2) 746-758.
Colic L, McDonnell C, Li M, Woelfer M, Liebe T, Kretzschmar F, Speck O, Schott BH, Bianchi M and Walter M (February-2019) Neuronal glutamatergic changes and peripheral markers of cytoskeleton dynamics change synchronically 24 h after sub-anaesthetic dose of ketamine in healthy subjects Behavioural Brain Research 359 312-319.
Windschuh J, Zaiss M, Ehses P, Lee JE, Jerschow A and Regatte RR (January-2019) Assessment of frequency drift on CEST MRI and dynamic correction: application to gagCEST at 7 T Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 81(1) 573-582.
Herz K, Gandhi C, Schuppert M, Deshmane A, Scheffler K and Zaiss M (January-2019) CEST imaging at 9.4 T using adjusted adiabatic spin‐lock pulses for on‐ and off‐resonant T1⍴‐dominated Z‐spectrum acquisition Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 81(1) 275-290.

 

Fixed-based flight simulator (HeliLab)

Multi-Panel Display
Schematic Overview of the System
Heli-Lab is a fixed-based flight simulator that affords a large field of view (i.e., 105°x100°). It is equipped to measure explicit and implicit behavioral responses — respectively, control stick inputs as well as eye-tracking and physiological measures. Thus, we are able to study the relationship between a pilot's actions and his cognitive workload during flight maneuvers.
 
The core system is an open-source flight simulator (FlightGear, www.flightgear.org) that accepts control inputs that are processed by a designated aircraft model to compute the appropriate world position and orientation of a modelled aircraft. Subsequently, these values are used to render the corresponding display of the world scene as seen from the cockpit, via a computing cluster for 10 wide-screen monitors.

Our system is equipped to record implicit behavioral responses. A remote eyetracking system (2 stereo-heads, 60 Hz; Facelab, Seeing Machines, USA) monitors the pilot's line-of-sight in the world scene as well as gaze on the heads-down instrument panel. Physiological measurements of the pilot are also recorded in tandem using a 16-channel active electrode system (g.Tec Medical Engineering GmbH, Austria). This system can be used to monitor the pilot's galvanic skin response, heart-rate variability and electro-encephalographic signals.

There are two control systems for the flight simulator that both feature generic helicopter controls such as a cyclic stick, a collective stick, and pedals. One system is unactuated and serves as any common joystick, while the other system consists of motorized controls (Wittenstein AG, Germany). This actuated system can be configured to resemble a wide range of control system dynamics, and can provide haptic feedback cues to the pilot. These cues can be used to support the pilot’s situational awareness.

The image here shows a schematic overview of the system (left). The information received by the user (red) and his control as well as physiological responses (blue) constitute part of this closed-loop system. A photo of the simulator in use (right) shows a participant performing a closed-loop control task (i.e., landing approach) while gaze is measured in real-time (inset).

Control Loading Lab

In the Control Loading Lab, we perform experimental evaluation to understand human behaviour in manual control tasks and to investigate novel approaches for human-machine interfaces. For this purpose, we use a fixed-base simulator with a control loaded sidestick, cyclic, collective and pedals from Wittenstein GmbH, Germany. These devices can simulate highly accurate control dynamics over a large frequency range and can be used to provide haptic feedback cues to the participant. The input devices are combined with a VIEWPixx display from VPixx Technologies, Canada, which can present stimuli at 120 Hz with accurate timing characteristics. Therefore, this lab provides an optimal environment for human-in-the-loop experiments.
Last updated: Friday, 14.10.2016