Looking for Participants

The MPI for Biological Cybernetics is looking for participants for some of their research experiments [more].
 

Most recent Publications

Guest JM, Seetharama MM, Wendel ES, Strick PL and Oberlaender M (January-2018) 3D reconstruction and standardization of the rat facial nucleus for precise mapping of vibrissal motor networks Neuroscience 368 171-186.
Zaretskaya N, Fischl B, Reuter M, Renvall V and Polimeni JR (January-2018) Advantages of cortical surface reconstruction using submillimeter 7 T MEMPRAGE NeuroImage 165 11-26.
Ardhapure AV, Sanghvi YS, Borozdina Y, Kapdi AR and Schulzke C (January-2018) Crystal structure of 8-(4-methyl­phen­yl)-2′-de­oxy­adenosine hemihydrate Acta Crystallographica Section E: Crystallographic Communications 74(1) 1-5.
Meilinger T, Garsoffky B and Schwan S (December-2017) A catch-up illusion arising from a distance-dependent perception bias in judging relative movement Scientific Reports 7(17037) 1-9.
Venrooij J, Mulder M, Mulder M, Abbink DA, van Paassen MM, van der Helm FCT and Bülthoff HH (December-2017) Admittance-Adaptive Model-Based Approach to Mitigate Biodynamic Feedthrough IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics 47(12) 4169-4181.
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Fixed-based flight simulator (HeliLab)

Multi-Panel Display
Schematic Overview of the System
Heli-Lab is a fixed-based flight simulator that affords a large field of view (i.e., 105°x100°). It is equipped to measure explicit and implicit behavioral responses — respectively, control stick inputs as well as eye-tracking and physiological measures. Thus, we are able to study the relationship between a pilot's actions and his cognitive workload during flight maneuvers.
 
The core system is an open-source flight simulator (FlightGear, www.flightgear.org) that accepts control inputs that are processed by a designated aircraft model to compute the appropriate world position and orientation of a modelled aircraft. Subsequently, these values are used to render the corresponding display of the world scene as seen from the cockpit, via a computing cluster for 10 wide-screen monitors.

Our system is equipped to record implicit behavioral responses. A remote eyetracking system (2 stereo-heads, 60 Hz; Facelab, Seeing Machines, USA) monitors the pilot's line-of-sight in the world scene as well as gaze on the heads-down instrument panel. Physiological measurements of the pilot are also recorded in tandem using a 16-channel active electrode system (g.Tec Medical Engineering GmbH, Austria). This system can be used to monitor the pilot's galvanic skin response, heart-rate variability and electro-encephalographic signals.

There are two control systems for the flight simulator that both feature generic helicopter controls such as a cyclic stick, a collective stick, and pedals. One system is unactuated and serves as any common joystick, while the other system consists of motorized controls (Wittenstein AG, Germany). This actuated system can be configured to resemble a wide range of control system dynamics, and can provide haptic feedback cues to the pilot. These cues can be used to support the pilot’s situational awareness.

The image here shows a schematic overview of the system (left). The information received by the user (red) and his control as well as physiological responses (blue) constitute part of this closed-loop system. A photo of the simulator in use (right) shows a participant performing a closed-loop control task (i.e., landing approach) while gaze is measured in real-time (inset).

Control Loading Lab

In the Control Loading Lab, we perform experimental evaluation to understand human behaviour in manual control tasks and to investigate novel approaches for human-machine interfaces. For this purpose, we use a fixed-base simulator with a control loaded sidestick, cyclic, collective and pedals from Wittenstein GmbH, Germany. These devices can simulate highly accurate control dynamics over a large frequency range and can be used to provide haptic feedback cues to the participant. The input devices are combined with a VIEWPixx display from VPixx Technologies, Canada, which can present stimuli at 120 Hz with accurate timing characteristics. Therefore, this lab provides an optimal environment for human-in-the-loop experiments.
Last updated: Friday, 14.10.2016