Project Leaders

Dr. Paolo Pretto 
Phone: +49 7071 601-644 
Fax: +49 7071 601-616 
paolo.pretto[at]tuebingen.mpg.de

Dr. Ksander de Winkel
Phone: +49 7071 601-643
Fax: +49 7071 601-616 
Opens window for sending emailksander.dewinkel[at]tuebingen.mpg.de

News

February 13, 2017
Two new papers published in PLoS ONE:
 
- Nesti A, de Winkel K, Bülthoff HH (2017) Accumulation of Inertial Sensory Information in the Perception of Whole Body Yaw Rotation.
(Opens external link in new windowPLoS ONE 12(1): e0170497)
 
- de Winkel KN, Katliar M, Bülthoff HH (2017) Causal Inference in Multisensory Heading Estimation.
(Opens external link in new windowPLoS ONE 12(1): e0169676)
 
January 30, 2017
Opens external link in new window27th Oculomotor Meeting - Program
The Program of the 27th Oculomotor meeting (3-4 Feb) is now available for download.
 
October 25, 2016
Opens internal link in current window27th Oculomotor Meeting
The website for the 27th Oculomotor meeting - held 3-4 February at our institute - is online! Follow the link above.
 
September 9, 2016
Opens external link in new windowDriving Simulation Conference 2016 VR
Joost Venrooij presented a paper and Paolo Pretto delivered a keynote presentation at the Driving Simulation Conference 2016 VR in Paris, France. The paper was titled: "Comparison between filter- and optimization-based motion cueing in the Daimler Driving Simulator". The keynote was titled: "Twenty years of DSC: a review of driver's motion perception research".

Opens internal link in current windowNews Archive

Five most recent Publications

Nooij SAE, Pretto P, Oberfeld D, Hecht H and Bülthoff HH (April-2017) Vection is the main contributor to motion sickness induced by visual yaw rotation: Implications for conflict and eye movement theories PLoS ONE 12(4) 1-19.
Nesti A, de Winkel K and Bülthoff HH (January-2017) Accumulation of Inertial Sensory Information in the Perception of Whole Body Yaw Rotation PLoS ONE 12(1) 1-14.
de Winkel KN, Katliar M and Bülthoff HH (January-2017) Causal Inference in Multisensory Heading Estimation PLoS ONE 12(1) 1-20.
Miermeister P, Lächele M, Boss R, Masone C, Schenk C, Tesch J, Kerger M, Teufel H, Pott A and Bülthoff HH (October-2016) The CableRobot Simulator: Large Scale Motion Platform Based on Cable Robot Technology, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2016), IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, USA, 3024-3029.
Venrooij J, Cleij D, Katliar M, Pretto P, Bülthoff HH, Steffen D, Hoffmeyer FW and Schöner H-P (September-8-2016) Comparison between filter- and optimization-based motion cueing in the Daimler Driving Simulator, DSC 2016 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibition, 31-38.
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Self-motion perception models


The results from psychophysical experiments are used to construct and improve self-motion perception models. These models describe the dynamics of the different sensory organs, the integration of information from different sensors; and how our sensitivity to particular motion components may depend on environmental factors. Next to aiding us in further understanding motion perception, these models allow us to predict how a certain motion stimulus will be perceived. E.g., they provide insight into whether the physical motion provided by a motion simulator will be perceived as congruent with the visual information displayed simultaneously.
 

 
A self-motion perception model is a mathematical model that tries to capture the nonlinear process of human self-motion perception. In essence, this model describes (i) the dynamics of the different perceptual sensors, (ii) the integration of information from different sensors; and (iii) how our sensitivity to particular motion components may depend on environmental factors.
We build upon well-known models of visuo-vestibular interaction and aim at both validating and extending this models. First, we address how linear and angular motion cues combine to form an integral percept of ones' motion through the environment. Second, we address how motion sensitivity depends on environmental factors.
To validate the model predictions, we investigated self-motion perception during curved trajectories, where both linear and angular cues are involved. For such trajectories, the model predicts that head yaw rotation is perceived quite veridically, the perceived heading (head relative to travelled path) is biased. Participants were exposed to circular trajectories in the MPI CyberMotion simulator, with their eyes covered. Using adaptive psychophysical techniques, we determined heading sensitivity and heading bias, and measured perceived yaw rotation and perceived travelled trajectory.
Our results show that the sensitivity for heading perception on curved trajectories is much lower than what is usually found for straight trajectories (see figure below). In line with other work of our group, this suggests that motion sensitivity decreases when multiple motion components (e.g., linear plus angular) are combined.

Results for heading bias and sensitivity. The red arrow indicates the average physical heading that is required to perceive the motion as being tangential to the curve, whereas the red shaded area denotes heading sensitivity, the range of heading angles in which the head is perceived as being tangential to the curve. These results are not in line with the model prediction (blue arrow), stating that the participant should be physically facing inward the curve in order to perceive being tangential to it.

Relevant publications

4. Nooij SAE, Nesti A, Bülthoff HH and Pretto P (August-2016) Perception of rotation, path, and heading in circular trajectories Experimental Brain Research 234(8) 2323–2337.
3. de Winkel KN, Katliar M and Bülthoff HH (September-2015) Heading Coherence Zone from Causal Inference Modelling, DSC 2015 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 67-70.
2. Nooij SAE, Pretto P and Bülthoff HH (September-2015) Sensitivity to lateral force is affected by concurrent yaw rotation during curve driving, DSC 2015 Europe: Driving Simulation Conference & Exhibition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Tübingen, Germany, 33-38.
1. de Winkel KN, Katliar M and Bülthoff HH (May-2015) Forced Fusion in Multisensory Heading Estimation PLoS ONE 10(5) 1-20.

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Last updated: Friday, 24.03.2017