Looking for Participants

The MPI for Biological Cybernetics is looking for participants for some of their research experiments [more].
 

Most recent Publications

Ferstl Y, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (September-2017) Action recognition is sensitive to the identity of the actor Cognition 166 201–206.
Schuenke P, Koehler C, Korzowski A, Windschuh J, Bachert P, Ladd ME, Mundiyanapurath S, Paech D, Bickelhaupt S, Bonekamp D, Schlemmer H-P, Radbruch A and Zaiss M (July-2017) Adiabatically prepared spin-lock approach for T1ρ-based dynamic glucose enhanced MRI at ultrahigh fields Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 78(1) 215-225.
Saulton A, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (July-2017) Conceptual biases explain distortion differences between hand and objects in localization tasks Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 43(7) 1444-1453.
Fichtner ND, Henning A, Zoelch N, Boesch C and Kreis R (July-2017) Elucidation of the downfield spectrum of human brain at 7 T using multiple inversion recovery delays and echo times Magnetic Resonance in Medicine 78(1) 11-19.
Zhao M and Bülthoff I (July-2017) Holistic Processing of Static and Moving Faces Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 43(7) 1020-1035.
pdf

 

The Departments and their Research Focus

Human Perception, Cognition and Action

In the “Human Perception, Cognition and Action” department, modern computer graphics and methods from Virtual Reality are used to examine how form and space are represented in the brain so that humans can name objects, interact with them and orient themselves in unfamiliar surroundings. Research is conducted into how information from different senses is handled to provide a coherent and consistent representation of the environment. [more]

Physiology of Cognitive Processes

The focus in the “Physiology of Cognitive Processes” department is on visual perception in primates. Research is conducted primarily into the questions of where visual perception is represented in the brain, which neurological processes underlie object recognition and the integration of different sensual stimuli and how the brain learns. Using magnetic resonance tomography, these issues are examined in experiments that combine psychophysical and the electrophysiological approaches. [more]

High-field Magnetic Resonance

The Magnetic Resonance Center is the domicile of the youngest department at the institute. It addresses the methodical development and optimization of imaging processes. The main areas of interest are magnetic resonance tomography with very high magnetic fields and the development of new contrast media which help to provide a detailed view of the function and metabolism of the brain. [more]
 Opens internal link in current windowFormer Department Empirical Inference

Last updated: Friday, 14.10.2016