Looking for Participants

The MPI for Biological Cybernetics is looking for participants for some of their research experiments [more].
 

Most recent Publications

Avdievich NI, Hoffmann J, Shajan G, Pfrommer A, Giapitzakis IA, Scheffler K and Henning A (February-2017) Evaluation of transmit efficiency and SAR for a tight fit transceiver human head phased array at 9.4 T NMR in Biomedicine 30(2) 1-12.
Kumar VJ, van Oort E, Scheffler K, Beckmann CF and Grodd W (February-2017) Functional Anatomy of the Human Thalamus at Rest NeuroImage 147 678–691.
Grassi PR, Zaretskaya N and Bartels A (February-2017) Scene segmentation in early visual cortex during suppression of ventral stream regions NeuroImage 146 71–80.
Goerke S, Milde KS, Bukowiecki R, Kunz P, Klika KD, Wiglenda T, Mogk K, Wanker EE, Bukau E, Ladd ME, Bachert P and Zaiss M (January-2017) Aggregation-induced changes in the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) signals of proteins NMR in Biomedicine 30(1) 1-9.
Kwon S, Watanabe M, Fischer E and Bartels A (January-2017) Attention reorganizes connectivity across networks in a frequency specific manner NeuroImage 144(Part A) 217-226.

 

The Departments and their Research Focus

Human Perception, Cognition and Action

In the “Human Perception, Cognition and Action” department, modern computer graphics and methods from Virtual Reality are used to examine how form and space are represented in the brain so that humans can name objects, interact with them and orient themselves in unfamiliar surroundings. Research is conducted into how information from different senses is handled to provide a coherent and consistent representation of the environment. [more]

Physiology of Cognitive Processes

The focus in the “Physiology of Cognitive Processes” department is on visual perception in primates. Research is conducted primarily into the questions of where visual perception is represented in the brain, which neurological processes underlie object recognition and the integration of different sensual stimuli and how the brain learns. Using magnetic resonance tomography, these issues are examined in experiments that combine psychophysical and the electrophysiological approaches. [more]

High-field Magnetic Resonance

The Magnetic Resonance Center is the domicile of the youngest department at the institute. It addresses the methodical development and optimization of imaging processes. The main areas of interest are magnetic resonance tomography with very high magnetic fields and the development of new contrast media which help to provide a detailed view of the function and metabolism of the brain. [more]
 Opens internal link in current windowFormer Department Empirical Inference

Last updated: Friday, 14.10.2016