Contact

Evangelia-Regkina Symeonidou

Address: Spemannstr. 38
72076 Tübingen
Room number: 109
Phone: +49 7071 601 610
Fax: +49 7071 601 616
E-Mail: eva-regkina.symeonidou

 

Picture of Symeonidou, Evangelia-Regkina

Evangelia-Regkina Symeonidou

Position: PhD Student  Unit: Bülthoff

Research Group: Opens internal link in current windowSpace and Body Perception

Supervisor: Opens external link in new windowBetty Mohler

 

My research investigates how the electroencephalographic (EEG) mu rhythm (8-13 Hz) can be used to assess shared control in man-machine interaction.  I am mostly interested in haptic support systems during flying tasks.

 

To date, researchers have mainly focused on the operator's performance when evaluating the utility of haptic feedback. EEG  measurements are rarely performed. However, changes in motor behavior are accompanied by diff erent patterns of neural desynchronisation. Therefore, it is worthwhile investigating changes in mu rhythm for different shared control parameters. This will allow us to assess the consequences of shared control to the cortical mechanisms of motor behavior.

Introduction

Haptic support systems have been designed to assist the operator in closed-loop-control tasks (e.g. driving and flying). Specifically, direct haptic feedback forces (DHF) can be applied over the control device (e.g. joystick) to pull the operator towards an optimal trajectory. DHF have been shown to improve performance [1] and increase safety [2]. Nonetheless, the operator might demonstrate over-reliance on the assistance or resist the DHF [3]. In order to examine the role of the operator during increasing haptic aid, we want to develop a robust electrophysiological marker reflecting neural motor effort during shared control. This marker can be integrated with existing measures for control performance.

 

Goal

The main goal of the project is to assess how changes in control performance are associated with changes in electroencephalographic (EEG) mu activity during increasing haptic aid in environments with and without motion feedback.

 

Methods

Participants will perform a compensatory tracking task while different levels of haptic aid are provided over the control device. The experiment is based on a DHF system developed in [1]. During the task EEG recordings will be acquired.


Initial results

Haptic feedback improves performance (i.e., the inverse of the root mean square error (RMSE)) for experienced and inexperienced subjects. The operator’s contribution (RMSE operator/RMSE haptic aid) decreased with increasing haptic aid up to the 50% gain level. The contribution of experienced subjects plateaued between the 50% and 100% condition. However, the inexperienced subjects seemed to rely on the support system during the 50% condition (operator’s contribution ≈1). This changed for the 100 % level where they started to actively contribute to performance (operator’s contribution>1).

 

Figure 2. The experienced and inexperienced operator’s performance as well as contribution to performance relative to the DHF (modified from [4]).

 

Initial conclusions

These findings suggest that the operator’s control behavior changes with increasing haptic support. Nonetheless, increasing haptic support does not necessarily result in over-reliance and can improve performance for both experienced and inexperienced subjects.

 

References

[1]       Olivari M , Nieuwenhuizen F , Bülthoff HH und Pollini L (2014) Pilot Adaptation to Different Classes of Haptic Aids in Tracking Tasks Journal of Guidance, Control, and Dynamics 37(6) 1741-1753.

[2]       K. K. Tsoi, M. Mulder, and D. A. Abbink (2010) Balancing safety and support: Changing lanes with a haptic lane-keeping support system 2010 IEEE Int. Conf. Syst. Man Cybern 1236–1243.

[3]       B. A. C. Forsyth and K. E. MacLean (2006) Predictive haptic guidance: intelligent user assistance for the control of dynamic tasks. IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput 12 103-13.

[4]       Symeonidou E-R , Olivari M , Bülthoff HH und Chuang LL (2014): The Role of Direct Haptic Feedback in a Compensatory Tracking Task, 12th Biannual Conference of the German Cognitive Science Society (KogWis 2014), Tübingen, Germany, Cognitive Processing, 15(Supplement 1) S71.

Education


2014- current PhD candidate at the International Max Planck Research School, Graduate Training Center of Neuroscience Tübingen
2011-13 MSc Experimental and Clinical Neurosciences, supported by the Elite Network of Bavaria, University of Regensburg
2009-11 BSc Biology, University of Regensburg

 

 

 

 

 

Work/Research Experience

 

4.2013-7.2013 Research assosiate at the University Hospital of Zurich, Neurology Department
6.2012-3.2013 Research Internship at the University Hospital of Zurich, Neurology Department
4.-6.2012 Research Internship at the Psychiatric University Clinic of Zurich, Deprtment of Gerontopsychiatry
2.-4.2012 Research Internship at the Experimental Psychology Department, University of Regensburg

 

Scholarships


10.2012-3.2013 Hildegard Hennsler-Stiftung
6.-9.2012 Elite Network of Bavaria

 


Preferences: 
References per page: Year: Medium:

  
Show abstracts

Articles (1):

Imbach LL, Valko PO, Li T, Maric A, Symeonidou E-R, Stover JF, Bassetti CL, Mica L, Werth E and Baumann CR (March-2015) Increased sleep need and daytime sleepiness 6 months after traumatic brain injury: a prospective controlled clinical trial Brain 138(3) 726-735.

Posters (8):

Symeonidou ER, Olivari M, Venrooij J, Bülthoff HH and Chuang LL (November-13-2016): EEG oscillatory modulations (10-12 Hz) discriminate for voluntary motor control and limb movement, 46th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2016), San Diego, CA, USA.
Symeonidou E-R, Olivari M, Bülthoff HH and Chuang LL (March-10-2015): Direct haptic feedback benefits control performance during steering, 57th Conference of Experimental Psychologists (TeaP 2015), Hildesheim, Germany.
Symeonidou E-R, Olivari M, Bülthoff HH and Chuang LL (September-2014): The Role of Direct Haptic Feedback in a Compensatory Tracking Task, 12th Biannual Conference of the German Cognitive Science Society (KogWis 2014), Tübingen, Germany, Cognitive Processing, 15(Supplement 1) S71.
Symeonidou E-R, Olivari M, Bülthoff HH and Chuang LL (June-2014): The Role of Direct Haptic Feedback in a Compensatory Tracking Task, 6th International Conference on Brain and Cognitive Engineering (BCE 2014), Tübingen, Germany.
Noain D, Imbach LL, Werth E, Schreglmann SR, Valko PO, Penner M, Morawska M, Li T, Maric A, Symeonidou E, Stover J, Mica L, Gavrilov YV, Scammell TE and Baumann CR (May-16-2014): Increased sleep need after traumatic brain injury: A comparative behavioural and histological study in rats and humans, Joint Annual Meeting 2014 Swiss Headache Society, Swiss Society for Sleep Research, Sleep Medicine and Chronobiology (SKG 2014), Luzern, Switzerland.
Symeonidou E-R, Imbach LL, Noain D, Penner M, Hodor A and Baumann CR (June-9-2013): State space analysis of sleep after traumatic brain injury in rats, 23rd Meeting of the European Neurological Society, Barcelona, Spain.
Noain D, Symeonidou E-R, Schreglmann S, Morawska MM, Penner M, Hodor A and Baumann CR (February-2-2013): Sleep Wake Disturbances after Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats, 17th Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society for Neuroscience (SSN 2013), Geneva, Switzerland.
Symeonidou E-R, Imbach LL, Noain D, Penner M and Baumann CR (February-2-2013): State Space Analysis of Sleep after Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats, 17th Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society for Neuroscience (SSN 2013), Geneva, Switzerland.

Talks (1):

Beer AL, Plank T, Symeonidou E-R, Meyer G and Greenlee MW (June-19-2012) Abstract Talk: Combining fiber tracking and functional brain imaging for revealing brain networks involved in auditory–visual integration in humans, 13th International Multisensory Research Forum (IMRF 2012), Oxford, UK, Seeing and Perceiving, 25(0) 5.

Export as:
BibTeX, XML, Pubman, Edoc, RTF
Last updated: Monday, 22.05.2017