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Dong-Seon Chang

 

Picture of Chang, Dong-Seon

Dong-Seon Chang

Position: PhD Student  Unit: Alumni Bülthoff

Action Recognition & Social Interaction

 

 

How do people recognize and understand the actions of other humans?

What information do they perceive and collect when they interact together?

Are action recognition processes different across cultures (e.g. Germany vs. Korea)?

 

In my PhD projects, I tried to answer these questions using Behavioral, Psychophysical and Cross-Cultural approaches. I use motion capture techniques to record human actions, and show these action mapped on 3D, life-sized avatars in a virtual reality (VR) setup. To assess the cognitive and neural processes underlying the representations of actions, we use a high-level action adaptation aftereffect paradigm. We recorded also different social interactions such as greetings or dancing (Salsa or Lindy Hop) to specifically assess how people recognize those actions in interactions. Studies have been conducted in Germany and Korea, to compare to influence of culture on the recognition of actions.

 

I am also an enthusiastic Science Communicator, trying to spread enthusiasm for science & research to a broad public. I have given more than 60 talks in the form of Science Slams, FameLab events, and TEDx Talks. If you are more interested in this, you can check out my videos online:

https://youtu.be/kRTU9bCdfD4 (German)

https://youtu.be/aNd6NNAg7Tc (English)

https://youtu.be/dfcnlADSuQ4 (English)

Personal Information

 

Date of Birth:                     May 28th, 1980

Place of Birth:                    Heidelberg, Germany

Nationality:                        Republic of Korea

 

Education

08/2012 –

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics (GER)

PhD Student, Dept. of Human Perception, Cognition and Action

Thesis Supervisor: Dr. Stephan de la Rosa

Thesis Advisors: Prof. Dr. Heinrich H. Bülthoff,

Prof. Dr. Martin Giese,

Prof. Dr. Kai Vogeley,

Dr. Hong Yu Wong

 

 

10/2006 – 08/2007

Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics (GER)

MSc, Dept. of Cognitive and Computational Psychophysics

Thesis Advisors: Prof. Dr. Heinrich.H. Bülthoff, Dr. John Butler

 

10/1999 – 08/2007

University of Konstanz (GER)

MSc in Biology (in collaboration with the MPI for Biol. Cybernetics)

Thesis Advisor: Prof. Dr. Giovanni Galizia

 

09/2003 – 06/2004

Rutgers, State University of New Jersey (USA)

Visiting Graduate Student, Rutgers Center for Cognitive Science

Visual Attention Laboratory, Advisor: Prof. Dr. Zenon Pylyshyn

 

03/1996 – 02/1999

Anyang-Highschool (KOR)

 

 

Work Experience

 

03/2011 – 07/2012

DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) IC Seoul (KOR)

Project Manager for ADeKo (Alumni Network Germany-Korea)

 

05/2008 – 05/2011

Acupuncture & Meridian Science Research Center,

Kyung Hee University (KOR)

Staff Researcher, Dept. of Oriental Medicine, Medical School

Advisors: Prof. Dr. Hyejung Lee, Prof. Dr. Younbyoung Chae

 

08/2004 – 09/2006

05/2003 – 08/2003

City Hospital Konstanz (GER)

MRI Technical Assistant, Dept. of Radiology

Advisors: Prof. Dr. Hansjörg Zwicker, Dr. Peter Köhler

 

05/2000 – 02/2006

University of Konstanz (GER)

Research Assistant

- Dept. of Developmental Psychology and Cross-Cultural Psychology, Advisor: Prof. Dr. Gisela Trommsdorf

 

03/2000 – 07/2000

SIEMENS, GmbH (GER)

Technical Assistant for the Development of an Automated Language Recognition Data System, Advisor: Dr. Torsten Caesar

 

 

Selected Awards  & Stipends

 

08/2012 – present

PhD Fellowship

Stipend of the Max Planck Society

 

05/2014

 

Travel Fellowship

Awarded by the Schwarz Foundation for Theoretical Neurobiology

to attend the 79th Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology: Cognition Meeting in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, USA

 

09/2013

First Prize

Science Slam

at the Visions in Science 2013, Max Planck Society's PhDnet Annual Conference for Junior Scientists

 

10/2010

Best Presentation Award

2010 Conference of the Korean Society of Stress Medicine

 

06/2007

First Prize

2006 Prize Question from the “Junge Akademie” at the National Academy of Germany (Academy of Sciences Leopoldina) and Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities

 

04/2007

Travel Grant for Interdisciplinary College 2007

From the German Association for Cognitive Science

(Gesellschaft für Kognitionswissenschaft e. V.)

 

 

Bülthoff HH , de la Rosa S , Chang D-S , Fedorov L and Giese M (August-31-2016) Abstract Talk: How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions, 39th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2016), Barcelona, Spain, Perception45 (ECVP Abstract Supplement) 267-268.
Previous research has shown that humans share numerous cognitive processes when they interact, such as representations of tasks, goals, intentions, and space. However, little is known about the perceptual representation of complementary actions, in particular actions in an interaction that are often observed together. We examined behavioral correlates of potentially shared neural representations for human actions that are visually dissimilar, but contingent from accumulated previous observations in spatiotemporal proximity. Namely, we measured visual adaptation aftereffects in 25 participants for perceiving the actions Throwing and Giving after prolonged exposure to the actions Catching and Taking, and vice versa, in a completely crossed design. We found significant adaptation aftereffects for all tested actions (p<0.001) as well as for the complementary actions. For the complementary actions, the overall adaptation aftereffect for the disambiguation of Catching from Taking was significant after prolonged exposure (adaptation) to Throwing and Giving (p<0.001), as well as for the disambiguation of Throwing from Giving when Catching and Taking were used as adaptors (p¼0.002). These results support the hypothesis that processes involved in the recognition of complementary actions might employ a shared neural representation.
html doi CiteID: ChangFGBd2016

Bülthoff HH , de la Rosa S and Chang D-S (July-29-2016) Abstract Talk: How different is Action Recognition across Cultures? Visual Adaptation to Social Actions in Germany vs. Korea, Europe-Korea Conference on Science and Technology (EKC 2016): Science, Technology and Humanity: Gateway to the Future, Berlin, Germany162.
The way social actions are used in everyday life to interact with other people differs across various cultures. Can this cultural specificity of social interactions be already observed in perceptual processes underlying the visual recognition of actions? We investigated whether there were any differences in action recognition between Western and East Asian cultures by testing German and Korean participants using questionnaires and a visual adaptation paradigm. First, both German and Korean participants had to recognize and describe four different social actions (handshake, punch, wave, fistbump) presented as brief movies of point-light-stimuli in an action naming task. Then, they had to rate similarities of actions in terms of their motion and meaning for all possible action pairs. Finally, we examined the underlying representations for each action using an action adaptation paradigm. Participants were repeatedly exposed to different action stimuli in separate experimental blocks. After being adapted in each experimental block, participants had to categorize ambiguous test stimuli in a 2-Alternatives-Forced-Choice (2AFC) task. The test stimuli were created by linearly combining the kinematic patterns of two actions such as a punch and a handshake. We measured the degree to which each of the four adaptors biased the perception of the subsequent ambiguous test stimulus for German and Korean participants. In the action naming task, the actions handshake, punch and wave were correctly recognized by both Germans and Koreans, but most Koreans failed to recognize the correct meaning of a fistbump. In the similarity rating task, both German and Korean participants showed highly consistent ratings. Also in the adaptation task, Germans and Koreans also showed remarkable similarities regarding the relative perceptual aftereffects induced by the adaptation to different action stimuli. In sum, our results imply a surprising consistency and robustness of action recognition processes across different cultures. Our methodology is suitable for further mapping different human actions in the brain, and these results may have also implications for the development of automated action recognition technologies for the field of social robotics and machine learning.
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Chang D-S (October-19-2015) Invited Lecture: What do others think of you? How the brain perceives other people, TEDxStuttgart: The Challenge, Stuttgart, Germany.
CiteID: Chang2015_5

Chang D-S , de la Rosa S and Bülthoff HH (July-27-2015) Invited Lecture: Action Recognition Across Cultures?, Symposium on Diversity of Social Cognition, Köln, Germany.
The way we use social actions in everyday life to interact with other people differs across various cultures. Can this cultural specificity of social interactions be already observed in perceptual processes underlying the visual recognition of actions? We investigated whether there were any differences in action recognition between Germans and Koreans using a visual adaptation paradigm. German (n=24, male=10, female=14) and Korean (n=24, male=13, female=11) participants first had to recognize and describe four different social actions (handshake, punch, wave, fist-bump) presented as brief movies of point-light-Stimuli. The actions handshake, punch and wave are commonly known in both cultures, but fistbump is largely unknown in Korea. In an adaptation aftereffect experiment, participants had to categorize the actions in a 2AFC task. We measured to what degree each of the four adaptors biased the perception of the presented actions for German and Korean participants. The actions handshake, punch and wave were correctly recognized by both Germans and Koreans, but most Koreans failed to recognize the correct meaning of a fistbump. However, Germans and Koreans showed a remarkable similarity in the pattern of aftereffects. These results imply a surprising consistency and robustness of action recognition processes across different cultures.
html CiteID: ChangBd2015

Chang D-S (July-10-2015) Invited Lecture: Wie versteht das Gehirn Handlungen?, IdeenExpo Finale 2015, Hannover, Germany.
html CiteID: Chang2015_4

Chang D-S (July-9-2015) Invited Lecture: Worauf fährt unser Gehirn ab? Online-Sein. Faszination. Sucht., "Cloud Conference": Fachtagung zum Thema exessiver Medienkonsum, Frankfurt a.M., Germany.
html CiteID: Chang2015_3

Chang D-S , de la Rosa S , Bülthoff HH and Ju U (June-25-2015) Abstract Talk: How different is action recognition across cultures? Visual adaptation to social actions in Germany vs. Korea, Aegina Summer School: The social self: how social interactions shape body and self-representations, Aegina, Greece.
The way we use social actions in everyday life to interact with other people differs across various cultures. Can this cultural specificity of social interactions be already observed in perceptual processes underlying the visual recognition of actions? We investigated whether there were any differences in action recognition between Germans and Koreans using a visual adaptation aftereffect paradigm. German (n=24, male=10, female=14) and Korean (n=24, male=13, female=11) participants had to recognize and describe four different social actions (handshake, punch, wave, fist-bump) presented as brief movies of point-light-stimuli. The actions handshake, punch and wave were commonly known in both cultures, but fist-bump was largely unknown in Korea. In the following experiment, using an adaptation aftereffect paradigm we measured to what degree repeated exposure to each action biased action representations. Although previously we found that semantic categorization of actions was crucial for action recognition, Germans and Koreans showed a remarkable similarity regarding the relative perceptual biases that the adaptors induced in the perception of the test stimuli. This similarity was rather explained by a superordinate level of action categorization than a basic level action naming task. In sum, these results imply a surprising consistency and robustness of action recognition processes across different cultures.
html CiteID: ChangJBd2015_2

Chang D-S (June-13-2015) Abstract Talk: Wie versteht das Gehirn Handlungen?, MPG Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
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Chang D-S and de la Rosa S (May-21-2015) Invited Lecture: Action Recognition & Social Interaction: New Experimental Paradigms, Rutgers University, Center for Cognitive Science, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
CiteID: Changd2015

Chang D-S , de la Rosa S , Bülthoff HH and Burger F (March-24-2015) Abstract Talk: Differences in Behavior and Judgments during interaction with a rope without seeing or hearing the partner, Symposium on Reciprocity and Social Cognition, Berlin, Germany.
html CiteID: ChangBBd2015

Bülthoff HH , de la Rosa S and Chang D-S (September-2014) Abstract Talk: Action recognition and the semantic meaning of actions: how does the brain categorize different social actions?, 12th Biannual Conference of the German Cognitive Science Society (KogWis 2014), Tübingen, Germany, Cognitive Processing15 (Supplement 1) S95.
Introduction The visual recognition of actions occurs at different levels (Jellema and Perrett 2006; Blake and Shiffrar 2007; Prinz 2013). At a kinematic level, an action can be described as the physical movement of a body part in space and time, whereas at a semantic level, an action can carry various social meanings such as about the goals or intentions of an action. In the past decades, a substantial amount of neuroscientific research work has been devoted to various aspects of action recognition (Casile and Giese 2005; Blake and Shiffrar 2007; Prinz 2013). Still, the question at which level the representations for different social actions might be encoded and categorically ordered in the brain is largely left unanswered. Does the brain categorize different actions according to their kinematic similarities, or in terms of their semantic meanings? In the present study, we wanted to find out whether different actions were ordered according to their semantic meaning or kinematic motion by employing a visual action adaptation aftereffect paradigm as used in our previous studies (de la Rosa et al. 2014). Materials and methods We used motion capture technology (MVN Motion Capture Suit from XSense, Netherlands) to record different social actions often observed in everyday life. The four social actions chosen as our experimental stimuli were handshake, wave, punch, yopunch (fistbump), and each of the actions were similar or different with the other actions either in terms of their semantic meaning (e.g. handshake and wave both meant a greeting, whereas punch meant an attack and yopunch meant a greeting) or kinematic motion (e.g. the movement of a punch and a yopunch were both similar, whereas the movement of a punch and a wave were very different). To quantify these similarities and differences between each action, a total of 24 participants rated the four different social actions pairwise in terms of their perceived differences in either semantic meaning or kinematic motion on a visual analogue scale ranging from 0 (exactly same) to 10 (completely different). All actions were processed into short movie clips (\2 s) showing only the joint movements of an actor (point-light stimuli) from the side view to the participants. Then, the specific perceptual bias for each action was determined by measuring the size of the action adaptation aftereffect in each participant. Each of the four different social actions were shown as a visual adaptor each block (30 s prolonged exposure in the start, 3 x repetitions each trial) while participants had to engage in a 2-Alternative-Forced-Choice (2AFC) task where they had to judge which action was shown. The test stimuli in the 2AFC task were action morphs in 7 different steps between two actions which were presented repeatedly (18 repetitions each block) and randomized. Finally, the previously obtained meaning and motion ratings were used to predict the measured adaptation aftereffect for each action using linear regression. Results The perceived differences in the ratings of semantic meaning significantly predicted the differences in the action adaptation aftereffects (p\0.001). The rated differences in kinematic motion alone was not able to significantly predict the differences in the action adaptation aftereffects, although the interaction of meaning and motion was also able to significantly predict the changes in the action adaptation aftereffect for each action (p\0.01). Discussion Previous results have demonstrated that the action adaptation aftereffect paradigm could be a useful paradigm for determining the specific perceptual bias for recognizing an action, since depending on the adaptor stimulus (e.g. if the adaptor was the same action as in one of the test stimuli) a significant shift of the point of subjective equality (PSE) was consistently observed in the psychometric curve judging the difference between two different actions (de la Rosa et al. 2014). This shift of PSE is representing a specific perceptual bias for each recognized action because it is assumed that this shift (adaptation aftereffect) would not be found if there would be no specific adaptation of the underlying neuronal populations recognizing each action (Clifford et al. 2007; Webster 2011). Using this paradigm we showed for the first time that perceived differences between distinct social actions might be rather encoded in terms of their semantic meaning than kinematic motion in the brain. Future studies should confirm the neuroanatomical correlates to this action adaptation aftereffect. The current experimental paradigm also serves as a useful method for further mapping the relationship between different social actions in the human brain.
html doi CiteID: ChangBd2014_4

de la Rosa S and Chang D-S (March-2014) Invited Lecture: Beyond Action Recognition: Making Social Inferences from Action Observation, Interdisciplinary College Spring School 2014: Cognition 3.0 - - the social mind in the connected world, Günne, Germany.
Humans daily interact with other people. Many of these interactions are physical interactions, e.g. when shaking the hand of another person. The human ability to read bodily signals is critical for successful social interaction. For example, knowing whether the interaction partner moves his hand for a punch or a handshake is essential for the production of an appropriate complementary response. How are humans able to read another person's actions? The aim of the course is to shed light onto how humans derive knowledge about another person's action by visual observation (action recognition). The course will discuss critical factors influencing action recognition from the perspective of various fields including philosophy, perception, cognition, neuroscience, and computational vision. The aim is to provide an integrative view of how humans recognize actions. In addition, the course will also discuss methodological issues (e.g. motion capture techniques) relevant for action recognition research. At the end of the course, students should have a firm understanding about action recognition.
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Chang D-S (November-14-2013) Invited Lecture: Perception of Social Cues and Prediction of Cooperation in the Brain, Kognition und Kooperation: Überzeugungen in Gehirn und Gesellschaft, Tübingen, Germany.
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Chang D-S (September-24-2013) Invited Lecture: The Social Brain, Visions in Science 2013: Shaping the Future, Dresden, Germany.
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Chang D-S (September-14-2013) Invited Lecture: Perception of Social Cues and Prediction of Cooperation in the Brain, Networks! 2013: 4th German Neurophysiology PhD Meeting, Tübingen, Germany.
html CiteID: Chang2013_3

Chang D-S , Kang O-S and Chae Y (December-2011) Abstract Talk: Smoking-related cue reactivity measured as attentional bias and brain BOLD responses in smokers: An Eye-tracking and fMRI study, 13th Annual Meeting of the Korean Society for Brain and Neural Science, Seoul, South Korea.
CiteID: ChangKC2011

Chang D-S (December-2010) Invited Lecture: Patients' preference of doctor's attire and its influence on the patient-doctor relationship, Sixth International Symposium on Acupuncture and Meridian Studies (SAMS 2010), Busan, South Korea, Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies3 (4) 307.
html doi CiteID: Chang2010_2

Chang D-S (December-2010) Invited Lecture: Smoking-related Cue Reactivity, measured as attentional bias and brain BOLD responses: An Eye-tracking and fMRI study, Department of Brain & Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea.
CiteID: Chang2010_3

Chang D-S (October-17-2010) Invited Lecture: Effect of doctor's attire on the patient-doctor relationship: Reducing patients' stress by improving the therapeutical relationship, 2010 Conference of the Korean Society for Stress Medicine , Seoul, South Korea.
CiteID: Chang2010

Chang D-S (March-2008) Invited Lecture: Art and Design from the perspective of Cognitive Neuroscience, Korea Design Foundation 2008: Special Workshop, Seoul, South Korea.
CiteID: Chang2008

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Books (1):

Chang D-S: Mein Hirn hat seinen eigenen Kopf: Wie wir andere und uns selbst wahrnehmen, 252, Rowohlt Polaris, Reinbek bei Hamburg, Germany, (September-2016). ISBN: 978-3-499-63135-1

Articles (14):

Chang D-S, Burger F, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (December-2015) The Perception of Cooperativeness Without Any Visual or Auditory Communication i-Perception 6(6) 1-6.
Lee I-S, Wallraven C, Kong J, Chang D-S, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (March-2015) When pain is not only pain: Inserting needles into the body evokes distinct reward-related brain responses in the context of a treatment Physiology & Behavior 140 148–155.
Chae Y, Lee I-S, Jung W-M, Chang D-S, Napadow V, Lee H, Park H-J and Wallraven C (October-2014) Decreased Peripheral and Central Responses to Acupuncture Stimulation following Modification of Body Ownership PLoS ONE 9(10) 1-10.
Kim H-S, Kim Y-J, Lee H-J, Kim S-Y, Lee H, Chang D-S, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (March-2013) Development and Validation of Acupuncture Fear Scale Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2013 1-8.
Chae Y, Chang D-S, Lee S-H, Jung W-M, Lee I-S, Jackson S, Kong J, Lee H, Park H-J, Lee H and Wallraven C (March-2013) Inserting Needles Into the Body: A Meta-Analysis of Brain Activity Associated With Acupuncture Needle Stimulation Journal of Pain 14(3) 215–222.
Chang D-S, Kim Y-J, Lee S-H, Lee H, Lee I-S, Park H-J, Wallraven C and Chae Y (March-2013) Modifying Bodily Self-Awareness during Acupuncture Needle Stimulation Using the Rubber Hand Illusion Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2013 1-7.
Lee S-H, Chang D-S, Kang O-S, Kim H-H, Kim H, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (December-2012) Do not judge according to appearance: patients’ preference of a doctor's face does not influence their assessment of the patient–doctor relationship Acupuncture in Medicine 30(4) 261-265.
Chung H, Lee H, Chang D-S, Kim H-S, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (December-2012) Doctor's attire influences perceived empathy in the patient–doctor relationship Patient Education and Counseling 89(3) 387–391.
Kang O-S, Chang D-S, Jahng G-H, Kim S-Y, Kim H, Kim J-W, Chung S-Y, Yang S-I, Park H-J, Lee H and Chae Y (August-2012) Individual differences in smoking-related cue reactivity in smokers: An eye-tracking and fMRI study Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 38(2) 285–293.
Chang D-S, Kang O-S, Kim H-H, Kim H-S, Lee H, Park H-J, Kim H and Chae Y (July-2012) Pre-existing beliefs and expectations influence judgments of novel health information Journal of Health Psychology 17(5) 753-763.
Shin H-W, Chang D-S, Lee H, Kang O-S, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (October-2011) What Factors Are Influencing Preferences Toward Conventional Versus Complementary and Alternative Medical Clinic Advertisements? Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 17(10) 953-959.
Chang D-S, Lee H, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (August-2011) What to Wear When Practicing Oriental Medicine: Patients' Preferences for Doctors' Attire Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine 17(8) 763-767.
Kang O-S, Chang D-S, Lee M-H, Lee H, Park H-J and Chae Y (January-2011) Autonomic and subjective responses to real and sham acupuncture stimulation Autonomic Neuroscience 159(1-2) 127–130.
Chae Y, Um S-I, Yi S-H, Lee H, Chang D-S, Yin CS and Park H-J (January-2011) Comparison of biomechanical properties between acupuncture and non-penetrating sham needle Complementary Therapies in Medicine 19(Supplement 1) S8–S12.

Conference papers (1):

Chang D-S (February-2015) Die Wahrnehmung von sozialen Signalen In: Kognition – Kooperation – Persuasion: Überzeugungen in Gehirn und Gesellschaft, , Tagung 2013: Kognition und Kooperation: Überzeugungen in Gehirn und Gesellschaft, Weidler, Berlin, Germany, 57-64.

Posters (14):

Meilinger T, Strickrodt M, Hinterecker T, Chang D-S, Saulton A, Fademrecht L and de la Rosa S (July-27-2016): Using Virtual Reality to Examine Social and Spatial Cognition, Virtual Environments: Current Topics in Psychological Research: VECTOR Workshop, Tübingen, Germany.
Chang D-S, Ju U, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (September-2015): How different is Action Recognition across Cultures? Visual Adaptation to Social Actions in Germany vs. Korea, 15th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2015), St. Pete Beach, FL, USA, Journal of Vision, 15(12) 493.
Chang D-S (July-3-2015): Blindly judging other people: Social interaction with an egoistic vs. cooperative person while being connected with a rope without seeing or hearing each other, 6th Joint Action Meeting (JAM 2015), Budapest, Hungary.
de la Rosa S, Wahn Y, Bülthoff HH, Fademrecht L, Saulton A, Meilinger T and Chang D-S (July-2-2015): Does the two streams hypothesis hold for joint actions?, 6th Joint Action Meeting (JAM 2015), Budapest, Hungary.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (September-2014): Actions revealing cooperation: predicting cooperativeness in social dilemmasfrom the observation of everyday actions, 12th Biannual Conference of the German Cognitive Science Society (KogWis 2014), Tübingen, Germany, Cognitive Processing, 15(Supplement 1) S33-S34.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (August-2014): Does Action Recognition Depend more on the Meaning or Motion of Different Actions?, 37th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2014), Beograd, Serbia, Perception, 43(ECVP Abstract Supplement) 103.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (June-2014): Visual Adaptation to Social Actions: The Role of Meaning vs. Motion for Action Recognition, 6th International Conference on Brain and Cognitive Engineering (BCE 2014), Tübingen, Germany.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (May-2014): Visual Adaptation to Social Actions: The Role of Meaning vs. Motion for Action Recognition, 79th Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology: Cognition, New York, NY, USA.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (August-2013): Making Trait Judgments based on Biological Motion Cues: A Thinslicing Approach, ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP '13), Dublin, Ireland.
Wellerdiek AC, Leyrer M, Volkova E, Chang D-S and Mohler B (August-2013): Recognizing your own motions on virtual avatars: is it me or not?, ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (SAP '13), Dublin, Ireland.
Chae Y, Chang D-S, Kim Y and Lee H (November-2011): Psychophysiological responses to acupuncture needle stimulation during modification of body ownerships induced by the Rubber Hand Illusion, 41st Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2011), Washington, DC, USA.
Chang D-S, Lee H and Chae Y (August-2011): Acupuncture and Placebo from the View of Cognitive Neuroscience: Trying to Connect Psychology and Physiology in the Brain and the Body, 21st World Congress on Psychosomatic Medicine (ICPM 2011), Seoul, South Korea.
Chang D-S, Park H-J and Chae Y (September-2010): Framing with doctors' faces influences judgments of health information, Cognitive Neuroscience Conference in Korea, Seoul, South Korea.
Chang D-S, Butler J and Schulte-Pelkum J (July-2007): The Visual and Vestibular Perception of Passive Self-Rotation, 10th Tübinger Wahrnehmungskonferenz (TWK 2007), Tübingen, Germany.

Talks (20):

Chang D-S, Fedorov L, Giese M, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (August-31-2016) Abstract Talk: How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions, 39th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2016), Barcelona, Spain, Perception, 45(ECVP Abstract Supplement) 267-268.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (July-29-2016) Abstract Talk: How different is Action Recognition across Cultures? Visual Adaptation to Social Actions in Germany vs. Korea, Europe-Korea Conference on Science and Technology (EKC 2016): Science, Technology and Humanity: Gateway to the Future, Berlin, Germany 162.
Chang D-S (October-19-2015) Invited Lecture: What do others think of you? How the brain perceives other people, TEDxStuttgart: The Challenge, Stuttgart, Germany.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (July-27-2015) Invited Lecture: Action Recognition Across Cultures?, Symposium on Diversity of Social Cognition, Köln, Germany.
Chang D-S (July-10-2015) Invited Lecture: Wie versteht das Gehirn Handlungen?, IdeenExpo Finale 2015, Hannover, Germany.
Chang D-S (July-9-2015) Invited Lecture: Worauf fährt unser Gehirn ab? Online-Sein. Faszination. Sucht., "Cloud Conference": Fachtagung zum Thema exessiver Medienkonsum, Frankfurt a.M., Germany.
Chang D-S, Ju U, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (June-25-2015) Abstract Talk: How different is action recognition across cultures? Visual adaptation to social actions in Germany vs. Korea, Aegina Summer School: The social self: how social interactions shape body and self-representations, Aegina, Greece.
Chang D-S (June-13-2015) Abstract Talk: Wie versteht das Gehirn Handlungen?, MPG Lange Nacht der Wissenschaften, Berlin, Germany.
Chang D-S and de la Rosa S (May-21-2015) Invited Lecture: Action Recognition & Social Interaction: New Experimental Paradigms, Rutgers University, Center for Cognitive Science, New Brunswick, NJ, USA.
Chang D-S, Burger F, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (March-24-2015) Abstract Talk: Differences in Behavior and Judgments during interaction with a rope without seeing or hearing the partner, Symposium on Reciprocity and Social Cognition, Berlin, Germany.
Chang D-S, Bülthoff HH and de la Rosa S (September-2014) Abstract Talk: Action recognition and the semantic meaning of actions: how does the brain categorize different social actions?, 12th Biannual Conference of the German Cognitive Science Society (KogWis 2014), Tübingen, Germany, Cognitive Processing, 15(Supplement 1) S95.
Chang D-S and de la Rosa S (March-2014) Invited Lecture: Beyond Action Recognition: Making Social Inferences from Action Observation, Interdisciplinary College Spring School 2014: Cognition 3.0 - - the social mind in the connected world, Günne, Germany.
Chang D-S (November-14-2013) Invited Lecture: Perception of Social Cues and Prediction of Cooperation in the Brain, Kognition und Kooperation: Überzeugungen in Gehirn und Gesellschaft, Tübingen, Germany.
Chang D-S (September-24-2013) Invited Lecture: The Social Brain, Visions in Science 2013: Shaping the Future, Dresden, Germany.
Chang D-S (September-14-2013) Invited Lecture: Perception of Social Cues and Prediction of Cooperation in the Brain, Networks! 2013: 4th German Neurophysiology PhD Meeting, Tübingen, Germany.
Chang D-S, Kang O-S and Chae Y (December-2011) Abstract Talk: Smoking-related cue reactivity measured as attentional bias and brain BOLD responses in smokers: An Eye-tracking and fMRI study, 13th Annual Meeting of the Korean Society for Brain and Neural Science, Seoul, South Korea.
Chang D-S (December-2010) Invited Lecture: Patients' preference of doctor's attire and its influence on the patient-doctor relationship, Sixth International Symposium on Acupuncture and Meridian Studies (SAMS 2010), Busan, South Korea, Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies, 3(4) 307.
Chang D-S (December-2010) Invited Lecture: Smoking-related Cue Reactivity, measured as attentional bias and brain BOLD responses: An Eye-tracking and fMRI study, Department of Brain & Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul, South Korea.
Chang D-S (October-17-2010) Invited Lecture: Effect of doctor's attire on the patient-doctor relationship: Reducing patients' stress by improving the therapeutical relationship, 2010 Conference of the Korean Society for Stress Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
Chang D-S (March-2008) Invited Lecture: Art and Design from the perspective of Cognitive Neuroscience, Korea Design Foundation 2008: Special Workshop, Seoul, South Korea.

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Last updated: Monday, 22.05.2017